Home
Trail Guides
White Oak Branch Wildlife Management Area


3
  
 
Whitehall Road, Franklin Township, NJ
Phone: (856) 629-0090
www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/wmas.htm

OWNER:  NJ Department of Environmental Protection

DIRECTIONS:  From the parking area at Malaga Lake, turn Left onto Malaga Park Drive. At the stop sign, turn Right onto Delsea Drive/ Route 47. Just after the first traffic light, turn Left onto Dutch Mill Road. After 4.1 miles turn Left onto Whitehall Road. Proceed to the end of the pavement and down the sand road into White Oak Branch Wildlife Management Area.

DIRECTIONS FROM NEAREST HIGHWAY:  From Route 55 take exit 39A for Route 40 East toward Malaga. Turn Left at the first traffic light onto Route 47/ Delsea Drive. Turn Right at the next traffic light, and then quick Left onto Dutch Mill Road. After 4.1 miles turn Left onto Whitehall Road. Proceed to the end of the pavement and down the sand road into White Oak Branch Wildlife Management Area.   Map

CampingGasFoodPhoneRestroomsLodging
ACCESS AND PARKING:  It’s a WMA, so it’s WILD! See information elsewhere in this brochure. Open daily from 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. Whitehall Road can be difficult to navigate. Do not attempt to drive through mud or sugar sand. Park your vehicle and proceed on foot. Another access point to the WMA exists along a power line cut on Bluebell Road. To reach this access point follow Whitehall Road back to the paved portion and make the first Right onto Salem Road. After 0.5 miles, Turn Left onto Pavalon Boulevard, then Right onto Bluebell Road. After 1.1 miles turn Right into the sandy parking area.

Sweet Bay Magnolia seeds
Sweet Bay Magnolia seedsRick Radis
 
SITE DESCRIPTION:  One of the most truly natural areas in the region, White Oak Branch Wildlife Management Area consists of over 2,600 acres of mixed forest, swamp areas and small streams. One can experience wildlife at its best along the sandy roads and trails. The forest is on the fringe of the Pinelands National Reserve and has more oaks than pitch pine throughout most of the uplands. The lowlands along White Oak branch and Faraway Branch are dominated by red maple and white cedar swamp. These pristine watersheds drain to the Great Egg Harbor River.

DON'T MISS:  Be sure to check the Electric Company right of way for spring warblers. Indigo Bunting and Orchard Oriole can also be spotted here.

THROUGH THE SEASONS:  
Winter:  In addition to year-round residents, wintering birds include Golden-crowned Kinglet, Dark-eyes Junco, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-throated Sparrow, and Yellow-rumped Warbler. Mammals such as white-tailed deer and gray fox can be tracked in the sand and snow and occasionally glimpsed crossing the power-line cut.
Spring:  Migrants such as Indigo Bunting, Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher, Great-Crested Flycatcher, and many wood warblers are singing. Wildflowers such as bird's foot violet, golden heather, and swamp azalea bloom in the woods. Chorus frog, cricket frog, spring peeper, gray treefrog, carpenter frog, and wood frog are among amphibians that can be seen and heard. Whip-poor-wills begin calling at dusk in late May. Insect repellent is recommended.
Summer:  Migrants such as Indigo Bunting, Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher, Great-Crested Flycatcher, and many wood warblers are singing. Wildflowers such as bird's foot violet, golden heather, and swamp azalea bloom in the woods. Chorus frog, cricket frog, spring peeper, gray treefrog, carpenter frog, and wood frog are among amphibians that can be seen and heard. Whip-poor-wills begin calling at dusk in late May. Insect repellent is recommended.
Fall:  Black gum trees provide beautiful colors, especially in the electric line cut. Wild Turkey frequently forage here. Look overhead and along the power lines for raptors such as Red-tailed hawk, Turkey Vulture, Black Vulture, and Peregrine Falcon.


SPECIAL FEATURES:  : For the adventurous, a two mile hike East along the power line cut from Blue Bell Road will leads to another trail that spurs off to the right and loops another mile or two through the unspoiled woods. Continuing straight to the end of the power line cut will bring visitors to an open, swampy area that is good for reptiles and amphibians.

Bike TrailsHandicapped AccessHiking TrailsHuntingIdeal for BeginnersParkingWildflowers